FL Criminal Defense Attorney Says No Comment While This Case is Pending

I read with great interest my friend, defense attorney Brian Tannebaum’s blog post yesterday about not commenting on the Casey Anthony case.

Brian has chosen not to share his views publicly on the most compelling criminal trial going on in America today. Instead, he urged lawyers, let the case be decided on its own merits, and do not seek your own personal fame at the possible expense of the woman on trial. Even when a jury is sequestered, leaks can occur, and no lawyer should risk being the source of one.

I am faced with a similar challenge. Rarely does a day go by without some member of the media asking about one of my pending cases. Every time, I decline the offer of an interview. The reason is that it is the right thing to do.

Criminal cases often make the papers. Especially if the Accused is a person of some fame or notoriety. Rock stars, athletes, politicians, and the like. When a famous person is being prosecuted, there seems to be an almost insatiable desire for all of the juicy details, and no one wants to wait to see the case run its course.

Recently, I have been involved in several high-profile criminal prosecutions. Two are now concluded. Others, including the baseball star’s, are still pending. The media want answers. They expect that you, their audience, do, too.

It is tempting to talk with them. The Detroit Free Press wrote a very flattering article about me not long ago. My parents and my sons were thrilled. But I will not discuss that case with the Detroit Free Press, or ESPN, or any other newspaper, right now.

I can and will discuss the very sad saga of Dustin Williams, the Florida teenager who accidentally shot and killed his best friend with a gun that belonged to a police officer.

I can and will discuss the successful defense of Molly Hatchet guitarist David Hlubek, who was wrongly arrested and wrongly accused of drunk driving.

I will not talk with you about cases that are ongoing. It would be wrong for either me or the prosecutors to try our cases in the media, and risk contaminating the jury pool. At some point, we will need to have six people listen to the evidence and decide these cases.

We all lose if jurors could bring into their deliberations information they heard on a radio interview or read in some newspaper.

Even if you are a fan of the Detroit Tigers, you will just have to wait. I will do my talking in the courtroom.

This Post Has 1 Comment

  1. Noak Kovacs says:

    I like your style Michael. Not disclosing views/opinions/ect on cases to the press is always a a wise move. The media can skew things, and as you mentioned before, cases can have leaks occur following the case, ect. This was a great read and had a nice personal tone to it, looking forward to reading more of your blogs.

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